Mata Ortiz Pottery Ivonne Olivas Matte Black Clay With White And Turquoise Paint Sculpted Top Pot

Mata Ortiz Pottery Ivonne Olivas Matte Black Clay With White And Turquoise Paint Sculpted Top Pot
$89.00

Availability: Out of stock

Ivonne Olivas is a very well known potter from the village of Mata Ortiz, Mexico. She began making pottery at the young age of 13, and has developed her skills to achieve great precision in her work. Her pots are thin walled, affordable, and expertly painted. She also studied under Juan Quezada, as her aunt is Juan's wife... nothing better than being taught by the great master of Mata Ortiz Pottery!! Ivonne Olivas took third place in her category at the 2017 Concurso, the juried art show sponsored by the Mexican government. We just love the flared top on this pot! The matte black clay takes on an almost chocolate brown color and then Ivonne accents it with white and turquoise paint. The combination is just strikingly beautiful! And the sculpted top adds another perfect touch! This piece was signed by the artist, and a pottery display ring will be included with your purchase at no additional cost.

Hand made without even the use of a potter’s wheel! Done in the traditional style of Mata Ortiz, with hand forming the piece out of clay that has been dug from the local countryside. The clay is sifted to remove the impurities, making the clay pliable and easier to work with than the standard clay that we find in art supply shops in the US. The artist starts with a flat pancake of clay, then adds a single coil of clay. They pinch the walls upward to form the pot, while scooping out the clay from within, and thinning the walls from the outside at the same time. Larger pieces will include a second coil added at the top. Mata Ortiz pottery is known for how thin walled and light weight it is, which makes it quite difficult to hand build without collapsing along the way. The piece will then dry for several days, before sanding the walls to get the walls. The surface of the pot is protected with a thin layer of oil, before hand polishing the surface with an agate stone. Then the piece is painted with natural paint using a home made brush crafted of long strands of human hair. A low temperature firing is the last step. Although there are some electric kilns in town these days, traditionally the pottery is fired on the ground using local wood similar to cottonwood. If it is a colored pot, the firing area is elevated on bricks to allow air to circulate during the firing, the pot is placed on a tripod or grate, covered with a clay or metal vessel, wood is stacked around the outer vessel and then ignited. Once the wood burns down, then the firing has been completed. If a black pot was desired, then sawdust or cow dung would be spread on the ground inside of the outer vessel and dirt would be used to seal the edges of the outer vessel, so that oxygen does not flow into the firing. Any actual color of clay could be used, and the pot would still turn black. The artist wanted the colors to remain on this piece, so oxygen was allowed to flow during the firing. One in every four or five pots break in a traditional firing. It is definitely a labor of love!
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Ivonne Olivas is a very well known potter from the village of Mata Ortiz, Mexico. She began making pottery at the young age of 13, and has developed her skills to achieve great precision in her work. Her pots are thin walled, affordable, and expertly painted. She also studied under Juan Quezada, as her aunt is Juan's wife... nothing better than being taught by the great master of Mata Ortiz Pottery!! Ivonne Olivas took third place in her category at the 2017 Concurso, the juried art show sponsored by the Mexican government. We just love the flared top on this pot! The matte black clay takes on an almost chocolate brown color and then Ivonne accents it with white and turquoise paint. The combination is just strikingly beautiful! And the sculpted top adds another perfect touch! This piece was signed by the artist, and a pottery display ring will be included with your purchase at no additional cost. Hand made without even the use of a potter’s wheel! Done in the traditional style of Mata Ortiz, with hand forming the piece out of clay that has been dug from the local countryside. The clay is sifted to remove the impurities, making the clay pliable and easier to work with than the standard clay that we find in art supply shops in the US. The artist starts with a flat pancake of clay, then adds a single coil of clay. They pinch the walls upward to form the pot, while scooping out the clay from within, and thinning the walls from the outside at the same time. Larger pieces will include a second coil added at the top. Mata Ortiz pottery is known for how thin walled and light weight it is, which makes it quite difficult to hand build without collapsing along the way. The piece will then dry for several days, before sanding the walls to get the walls. The surface of the pot is protected with a thin layer of oil, before hand polishing the surface with an agate stone. Then the piece is painted with natural paint using a home made brush crafted of long strands of human hair. A low temperature firing is the last step. Although there are some electric kilns in town these days, traditionally the pottery is fired on the ground using local wood similar to cottonwood. If it is a colored pot, the firing area is elevated on bricks to allow air to circulate during the firing, the pot is placed on a tripod or grate, covered with a clay or metal vessel, wood is stacked around the outer vessel and then ignited. Once the wood burns down, then the firing has been completed. If a black pot was desired, then sawdust or cow dung would be spread on the ground inside of the outer vessel and dirt would be used to seal the edges of the outer vessel, so that oxygen does not flow into the firing. Any actual color of clay could be used, and the pot would still turn black. The artist wanted the colors to remain on this piece, so oxygen was allowed to flow during the firing. One in every four or five pots break in a traditional firing. It is definitely a labor of love! Approximate Measurements: 5 1/8" x 4 3/4" wide (15 1/4" in circumference at it's widest point )
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